Finest Fugu Specialty Restaurant

The Honor of Japanese Cuisine

Throughout the world, fugu, or blowfish, is only eaten in Japan. Its history spans over a thousand years. Beloved by Japanese, fugu is one of the roots of Japanese culture, and could be called the honor of Japanese cuisine. We are grateful to be able to offer this revered cuisine at the highest quality throughout all seasons of the year.

Osaka Torafugu no Kai's High Standards

slider-1

Torafugu (tiger blowfish) grow to be 20 – 30cm in length at one year old, about 40cm at three years, and about 50cm at five years. They are believed to live for approximately ten years. The largest torafugu are over 70cm in length. The female begins to mature at three years and the male at two. Their breeding season is from spring to early summer. They inhabit the bottom of sandy and muddy areas between the shore and far out at sea. Within Japan, they live on all of the country's surrounding coasts. They eat shrimp, crab, squid and fish. When they are cultivated, they are raised from young fish at sea level. Farmers generally ship torafugu that are more than 30cm long and weigh around 1kg, after a feeding period of one-and-a-half to two years.

slider-1

The words "yakifugu™" may bring to mind an image of sundry pieces of bony meat cooked with soy sauce over a fire. However, Osaka Torafugu no Kai's yakifugu™ is the exact opposite of this, using specific, boneless cuts of meat. It is a main dish focusing on one thing -- the meat itself. The blowfish meat is cooked on a grill, much like yakiniku, in which you grill slices of beef or pork. There are two cuts of meat used in our yakifugu™ – totomi, the third layer of meat from the topmost layer of skin, and mikawa, one layer further inside the totomi. This part has a full, gelatinous texture and is extremely delicious. When you bite into it, you can enjoy the crunchiness of the meat. The meat used for our yakifugu™ is coated in special oil, and is grilled over an open gas flame, so as not to let the delicious flavor escape. The grill locks in the moisture and allows you to enjoy a more delicious, crunchy fugu experience. Osaka Torafugu no Kai's yakifugu™ is really a luxurious dish.

slider-1

Coming soon...

slider-1

Fin sake and fin shochu (distilled spirit) are made using blowfish fins prepared to the most exacting specifications. Freshly harvested fins are aged for a full day, washed, then dried in full sunlight to remove any trace of blood. The completely dried fins are then roasted in an oven to bring out their savory flavor. The fins are then grilled to perfection, one by one, to remove any raw odors. Each of these painstakingly prepared fins can produce a wonderful soup base, making for a truly extraordinary fin in sake or shochu, as the fin is served with warm sake or shochu and lit on fire, providing a unique and enjoyable experience.

slider-1

An indispensable item to pair with fugu, the word "ponzu" comes from the Dutch word pons, meaning punch, and su, the Japanese for vinegar. Traditionally, ponzu was made using citrus juices, which made it an excellent accompaniment to fugu. However, modern manufacturers use vinegar to reduce cost, and authentic ponzu in the traditional style is quite rare. Osaka Torafugu no Kai, after over 200 attempts, has recreated a traditional style fruit-based ponzu sauce. To reproduce the vivid, lush aroma of fresh citrus, our ponzu is made from over 20 ingredients, but the primary focus is on Tokushima sudachi, yuzu, and citron. It is carefully prepared with slight variations based on the season of each fruit. Exquisite in taste, our "Fruit Ponzu" has a vivid aroma, and is an important part of the Osaka Torafugu no Kai experience.

slider-1

You dip your grilled fugu in it. We put it in the soup. Wherever we use salt, we use our special toge-shio. Most people probably haven't heard of toge-shio. The outer surface of the blowfish, which is usually removed after parboiling, is covered with tiny thorns. This outer skin is usually discarded, though it can be used to make a delicious broth. We, however, dry it in the sun, as with the fins used for our fin in sake, and grill it to bring out the flavor. Then we pulverize the grilled skins, and mix them with salt from the deep ocean, to produce our toge-shio. Without any bitterness or unpleasant taste, or any unnecessary flavors, this "thorny salt" adds just a dash of fugu depth, and puts the finishing touch on all of our dishes.

PAGE TOP